start a business – Young Money http://finance.youngmoney.com Money: Earn it, Invest it, Spend it Tue, 19 Sep 2017 09:45:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 How to Make Money from Your Photography http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/how-to-make-money-from-your-photography/ http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/how-to-make-money-from-your-photography/#respond Tue, 22 Aug 2017 18:35:13 +0000 http://finance.youngmoney.com/?p=11647 This post is by guest author Amethyst Tagney. Amethyst spends her time writing on a variety of topics. She is an avid learner and loves to share what she discovers. You can find her @AmTagWrites

Snapping a picture can be easy. Selling that picture can be less so. As a photographer, breaking into the field takes a mixture of talent, connections, and luck.

With any profession in the arts, it takes an incredible amount of work to be successful, let alone make money. However, if you know the right steps to take, it can be as easy as saying, “Cheese!”

Find Your Niche

Sometimes it’s smiled upon to be good at everything. This is not the case, though, when it comes to making money in photography. If you’re aiming for success in your career as a photographer, pick one thing that you love to take photos of and become really good at that.

So, if portraiture is your thing, then take portraits. If fashion is your calling, then take fashion photos. You can even be successful with photobooths if that is the route you want to take.

Potential clients will not be thrilled to look at a portfolio that is all over the place genre-wise when they are specifically looking for a wedding photographer. The key is to tailor your collection of work around a specific client, so that when they see your photographs, they know exactly what they’re getting into.

Get the Right Equipment

Once you figure out what genre to focus on, it’s time to acquire the camera — but not just any camera. Acquiring the right camera gear is essential to a successful photography business. The type of equipment you will need will be different depending on what kind of photography you are practicing.

You would not need the same equipment for landscape photography as you would for war photography. Make sure to take the time to research what specific needs the genre of photography you have chosen will have and what equipment will fill those needs. Another option to consider is renting the gear you need if purchasing it yourself is not feasible at the time.

Make an Eye-Catching Portfolio

So you have the equipment and you know what pictures to take. Now comes the fun part: putting together your portfolio. There are many tips on how to build a better portfolio, but here are a few to get you started.

First of all, make sure to show variety. Not in genre, but in lighting, camera angles, and subjects within your chosen niche. The number one thing you do not want your client to be is bored when flipping through your photos.

However, keep the size and orientation of the photographs the same. You will also want your portfolio to start strong and end strong. Do not include pictures you are less than happy with. Chances are potential clients will be less than happy as well.

Lastly, make sure you print your photo book. Clients are looking to buy physical prints from you, so it only makes sense to show them something they can physically touch and see. This will also give them a better idea of what the finished product will look like.

Be Social on Social Media

Social media is one of the most important things you can get involved in as a photographer. You need an online presence that people can find so that your photos and services can be found as well. You also need an overarching website that connects with all the social media platforms you’re active on.

In this digital age, it’s essential to be online where your clients will be. Social media is also a great way to network with other professionals and potential clients, as freelance photographer Ashley Grant would tell you. Forming these connections is crucial to your ultimate success as a photographer.

Consider investing some time in starting a blog as well. When you make content that is useful and relevant to your clients, they will most likely follow you and use you for current or future projects.

Let’s Make Some Money

Now, what you’ve all been waiting for: it’s time to make some money! There are many different avenues you can take when it comes to selling your photographs and services. Some ways to earn money as a photographer include:

  • Selling prints at art fairs, local businesses, galleries or on online stores.
  • Entering contests to not only receive validation and potentially informative critiques, but also a nice sum of money if you win.
  • Becoming an assistant for an already established photographer. More often than not, they can use the extra help with coverage over large events such as weddings. In exchange, you get much needed experience and a paycheck too.
  • Licensing your images as stock photos. Let your photos make the money for you as multiple people can pay to use a single image over and over again.

Always Continue to Learn

It’s a dangerous place to be when you think there’s nothing else for you to learn. Photography, like any artistic pursuit, is always changing. Better technology is always coming out, and if you stay in one place for very long, more ambitious photographers will pass you by — along with your clients.

Although some older techniques and methods are still used for more artistic reasons, if you want to stay in business as a photographer, you need to keep up with new advancements in your medium. This applies as well to photo editing software. If you don’t know what Photoshop is, you need to.

Taking Photoshop classes, along with classes in any other software you’re unfamiliar with, is essential to making your photographs the best they can possibly be. These programs are always being updated with new features and tools to improve your photos, so now is the time to learn all you can.

It takes a certain focus to be a photographer — even more so if you want to make money from it. However, things become more clear when you zoom in on the things that matter most in your career. It’s important to know what you want to specialize in and get the right gear for it.

Then you’ll be better equipped to make a prize winning portfolio that can be shared on your website and social media accounts. This will make receiving money from your photos much easier, especially if you keep on top of the learning curve. If you follow this guide and put in the effort, your career as a photographer will have a better chance of being picture perfect.

Snapping a picture can be easy. Selling that picture can be less so. As a photographer, breaking into the field takes a mixture of talent, connections, and luck.

With any profession in the arts, it takes an incredible amount of work to be successful, let alone make money. However, if you know the right steps to take, it can be as easy as saying, “Cheese!”

Find Your Niche

Sometimes it’s smiled upon to be good at everything. This is not the case, though, when it comes to making money in photography. If you’re aiming for success in your career as a photographer, pick one thing that you love to take photos of and become really good at that.

So, if portraiture is your thing, then take portraits. If fashion is your calling, then take fashion photos. You can even be successful with photobooths if that is the route you want to take.

Potential clients will not be thrilled to look at a portfolio that is all over the place genre-wise when they are specifically looking for a wedding photographer. The key is to tailor your collection of work around a specific client, so that when they see your photographs, they know exactly what they’re getting into.

Get the Right Equipment

Once you figure out what genre to focus on, it’s time to acquire the camera — but not just any camera. Acquiring the right camera gear is essential to a successful photography business. The type of equipment you will need will be different depending on what kind of photography you are practicing.

You would not need the same equipment for landscape photography as you would for war photography. Make sure to take the time to research what specific needs the genre of photography you have chosen will have and what equipment will fill those needs. Another option to consider is renting the gear you need if purchasing it yourself is not feasible at the time.

Make an Eye-Catching Portfolio

So you have the equipment and you know what pictures to take. Now comes the fun part: putting together your portfolio. There are many tips on how to build a better portfolio, but here are a few to get you started.

First of all, make sure to show variety. Not in genre, but in lighting, camera angles, and subjects within your chosen niche. The number one thing you do not want your client to be is bored when flipping through your photos.

However, keep the size and orientation of the photographs the same. You will also want your portfolio to start strong and end strong. Do not include pictures you are less than happy with. Chances are potential clients will be less than happy as well.

Lastly, make sure you print your photo book. Clients are looking to buy physical prints from you, so it only makes sense to show them something they can physically touch and see. This will also give them a better idea of what the finished product will look like.

Be Social on Social Media

Social media is one of the most important things you can get involved in as a photographer. You need an online presence that people can find so that your photos and services can be found as well. You also need an overarching website that connects with all the social media platforms you’re active on.

In this digital age, it’s essential to be online where your clients will be. Social media is also a great way to network with other professionals and potential clients, as freelance photographer Ashley Grant would tell you. Forming these connections is crucial to your ultimate success as a photographer.

Consider investing some time in starting a blog as well. When you make content that is useful and relevant to your clients, they will most likely follow you and use you for current or future projects.

Let’s Make Some Money

Now, what you’ve all been waiting for: it’s time to make some money! There are many different avenues you can take when it comes to selling your photographs and services. Some ways to earn money as a photographer include:

  • Selling prints at art fairs, local businesses, galleries or on online stores.
  • Entering contests to not only receive validation and potentially informative critiques, but also a nice sum of money if you win.
  • Becoming an assistant for an already established photographer. More often than not, they can use the extra help with coverage over large events such as weddings. In exchange, you get much needed experience and a paycheck too.
  • Licensing your images as stock photos. Let your photos make the money for you as multiple people can pay to use a single image over and over again.

Always Continue Learning

It’s a dangerous place to be when you think there’s nothing else for you to learn. Photography, like any artistic pursuit, is always changing. Better technology is always coming out, and if you stay in one place for very long, more ambitious photographers will pass you by — along with your clients.

Although some older techniques and methods are still used for more artistic reasons, if you want to stay in business as a photographer, you need to keep up with new advancements in your medium. This applies as well to photo editing software. If you don’t know what Photoshop is, you need to.

Taking Photoshop classes, along with classes in any other software you’re unfamiliar with, is essential to making your photographs the best they can possibly be. These programs are always being updated with new features and tools to improve your photos, so now is the time to learn all you can.

It takes a certain focus to be a photographer — even more so if you want to make money from it. However, things become more clear when you zoom in on the things that matter most in your career. It’s important to know what you want to specialize in and get the right gear for it.

Then you’ll be better equipped to make a prize winning portfolio that can be shared on your website and social media accounts. This will make receiving money from your photos much easier, especially if you keep on top of the learning curve. If you follow this guide and put in the effort, your career as a photographer will have a better chance of being picture perfect.

]]>
http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/how-to-make-money-from-your-photography/feed/ 0
The Young Entrepreneur’s Guide to Relocating http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/the-young-entrepreneurs-guide-to-relocating/ Thu, 27 Jul 2017 22:15:45 +0000 http://finance.youngmoney.com/?p=11602 This post is from guest author Jesse Johnson.

So, you’ve reached the point where you need to establish new roots for your business somewhere else. There are plenty of reasons to relocate, such as moving closer to your main clients, pursuing new market opportunities, seeking lower overhead costs, expanding to a bigger space, or attracting a new workforce. Whatever your reasons, this decision is going to come down to a number of factors, including the demographics of the new area, the potential for your business to engage target markets, the cost of living and operations, and the quality of life.

Although relocating carries risks, it can be the best thing you’ll ever do for your business. Here are a few major considerations any young entrepreneur should keep in mind when relocating.

Where Should You Go?

If you can go anywhere, be sure to choose carefully. There are plenty of smaller towns that offer the potential for strong customer relationships and low overhead costs. Lower costs could allow the business to experiment without the steep financial risks present in larger cities. However, anyone looking to engage within a large professional network may find themselves cut off from other industry professionals. Also, depending on your plans for expansion, it can be difficult to find and retain talented employees in smaller towns.

On the other end of the spectrum, moving to a place like San Francisco would offer a surge of culture, industry, and networking opportunities, but you’ll need to make sure you can afford the cost of living, which is among the highest in the U.S. For a better balance of culture and cost, Austin is a young entrepreneur’s paradise, featuring live music, great food and art, and a relatively young population with a median age of 31. Austin is also home to the University of Texas, which means as your business grows, you’ll have access to a steady flow of qualified graduates who are looking for work.

Of course, relocation doesn’t have to involve a cross-country move. You could find plenty of advantages to relocating within the same area. You might find a more suitable space just down the street that offers lower rent, a bigger space, or better parking for customers and employees.

There is also a trend of businesses moving to the suburbs surrounding large cities in order to lower their costs.

Finding the Right Space

If you have a general area in mind, it’s time to scour the place looking for just the right workspace. Early on in the process, you should make a list of all the requirements a new space must satisfy in order to support your business. This could include things like visibility from the street, a break room or kitchen, sensible parking, technological capabilities, plenty of space to work, room to continue expanding your workforce, and the maximum amount you could feasibly budget each month for rent and other costs.

Look for hard facts about the area, such as traffic numbers, distance to major highways and main streets, property taxes, insurance, operating expenses, build-out costs, the landlord’s reputation, and nearby businesses. You can also subscribe to the local paper or read them online in order to get a basic understanding of the cultural context of the area.

As you move forward with any space, pay attention to the length and terms of the lease. You wouldn’t want to sign on for a multi-year lease if it’s likely you’ll outgrow the space within that time or if business doesn’t pick up as planned. In some cases, even if you sell your business, the responsibilities of maintaining the terms of the lease might fall to the original lessee. This could be particularly disastrous if the person who bought your company hasn’t been paying the rent.

Once you’ve found a few spaces that meet your requirements, be sure to visit each location in person. Aside from inspecting the condition of the facility, make note of the traffic and people you see in order to better understand the dynamic surrounding the location. Spend some time exploring the city in order to get a feel for what day-to-day life might be like for you and your employees.

Employee Considerations

You should let your employees know about the plan to move at least 4 to 6 months in advance. If you are moving to another city, your employees may not be willing to relocate, and for more local moves, an increased commute can also put a strain on employees. You should consider the cost of living as it applies to your employees, and you may need to offer a pay raise or the option to work remotely in order to keep your most essential employees.

Quality of life for employees in a new location can have a significant impact on productivity, for better or worse. Take the time to look into nearby recreational opportunities, schools, crime rates, options for health care, and climate in the area. Moving to a safe place with plenty of fun things to do can increase the chance that you’ll retain current employees, attract new talent, and keep them happy in and outside of the workplace.

Financial Challenges

Before committing to the move, make sure you have enough money to safely carry your business through the transition, and be realistic about what is feasible. Even if the move is intended to save money in the long run, there are short-term costs that you’ll need to account for. These include hiring movers, transportation costs for yourself and employees, finishing and furnishing the space, buying new office equipment and technology, and hiring and training new employees. It’s also common to see a decrease in productivity for a while as your employees and customers adjust to the changes.

While some cities offer incentives for new businesses, some also have stricter laws for businesses as well as higher taxes. Thoroughly research all local regulations as you plan your budget.

Making the Move

Once you’ve decided where you’d like to go, there are all new things you’ll need to consider to make the move successful as well as common mistakes to avoid. If you haven’t done so already, create a comprehensive plan for the move and delegate different responsibilities to your employees. No detail is too small. This could include putting someone in charge of packing any leftover kitchen supplies as well as deciding who should update the address listed on your website.

By dividing the work, you can ensure that no one person has to shoulder too many burdens through the process, including yourself. Refer to this plan before the move, during the transition, and afterward in order to make sure you won’t have any unpleasant surprises later on.

Depending on the distance of the move, it might make more sense to quickly sell or donate some office equipment in order to avoid high shipping costs. If you choose to donate these items, you may be able to receive a tax deduction which can help offset moving costs.

Though you might ask for help from employees during the initial packing process, hiring a moving service is likely your best option for actually transporting equipment, furniture, and documents to the new location. You should plan to hire movers at least 1 to 3 months before the move in order to ensure they will be able to schedule your move well in advance.

Final Tips

Start early. It can take years to find the right place and ensure that you have the funds to sustain your business during the transition. If you feel like your business has the potential to expand to a new location, start looking now. It’s better to understand your options ahead of time rather than waiting until it’s too late and having to make a speedy, uninformed decision.

This may seem obvious, but it’s important to let your clients know well in advance that you’re moving. Consider receiving mail at both locations for a few weeks in order to make sure nothing is lost, and station an employee at the new location before the move so clients can begin engaging with the new number and address. This will also make sure essential services like phone and internet are working properly before you’ve fully moved in. It may be worth it to contract additional IT personnel to ensure this part of the transition goes smoothly.

It’s also possible that you don’t need to move at all in order to expand your business. In exploring all of your options, you could look into renting an adjoining space or find a separate location nearby while remaining active at your original site. Either of these options could prevent some of the disruption to productivity that typically takes place during a move and would allow customers who might be put off by a new location to remain loyal.

Even if you find the perfect space, it’s affordable, and everything goes well with the move, there is still a chance that it just won’t work out like you’d planned. Customers may not find the new location convenient, and even if you’ve chosen a location that is closer to your target market, you may risk losing your current customers. You might also find out too late that there isn’t as strong of a demand for your services as you predicted.

Despite these risks, relocation can be the key to expanding your business and creating a powerful brand with a solid customer base and loyal employees. By following these guidelines and creating a detailed plan, you can take the stress out of your move and have a successful transition to your new location.

]]>
How to Make Change a Positive Experience for Your Millennial Employees http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/how-to-make-change-a-positive-experience-for-your-millennial-employees/ Thu, 11 May 2017 19:10:05 +0000 http://finance.youngmoney.com/?p=11532

Starting your own business? You’ll need to hire and retain some excellent talent. Millennials are highly trained and skilled, and they’re ready to join your workforce. Yet, at work 71% of millennials are not engaged, and 47% will switch jobs if this doesn’t improve.

As the millennial generation begins to mature and make career inroads, observers keep noting a salient trend: these young people change jobs a lot. Good employers are eager to buck the attrition trend and invest much-needed retention efforts in valuable millennial employees. But why do us millennials jump from job to job so often to begin with?

There’s a lot of competition for our talent. And, there are constant, often abrupt changes happening. Companies get bought out, they grow in leaps and bounds, they alter direction, or they dwindle and suddenly die. In today’s business world, change is the only constant.

You must find strength in change and help employees view developments in a positive light, even if they’re negative. This starts with management.

Empower Managers

According to Terry Petracca, an HR expert from MEL, managers are the number one reason employees leave organizations. This applies big-time to situations of company upheaval and change. Petracca believes authenticity is the number one way for managers to establish a relationship of trust with employees. She says, “A manager needs their employees to believe them because they’re the gatekeeper for truth and knowledge about the company.”

In order for a manager to be authentic, in order for a manager to impart “truth and knowledge” to employees during a time of change, you must empower your managers:

  • Encourage transparency
  • Regularly brief managers with all the facts and bottom line information that affects change
  • Reinforce and encourage their leadership abilities
  • Give them a voice throughout the transitional process, seriously consider their suggestions and act on them whenever possible

Although change is inevitable, losing employees isn’t. Employees value honesty and rapport with you and your managers. Managers are particularly close to employees during day-to-day operations. When they build strong rapport with employees through honesty and communication, employees are less likely to leave. The manager effectively leads them through change as it happens.

Encourage Stress Management

When you’re under a ton of stress due to transition, it can be hard to recognize employees are too. The weight feels like it’s all on you. For anyone, stress triggers a fight or flight response. For employees who aren’t as rooted in the business as you are, it’s easier to quit when stress gets overwhelming. Ignore the fact that employees are stressed, and risk losing employees—and that includes managers.

Coach employees on stress relief tactics; doing so will acknowledge and validate their feelings. They probably know these tactics already, but a quick refresher on the following stress relief techniques will provide everyone with a welcome moment of levity:

  • Listen to music: Listening to relaxing music can lower blood pressure and reduce the release of cortisol, a chemical related to stress
  • Talk to a friend: In and out of the workplace, communicating with someone about stressors really puts things in perspective
  • Coach yourself through it: The most successful individuals know the value of positive self-talk
  • Eat a healthy diet: Foods with high Omega-3 content, such as fish, can help reduce stress symptoms
  • Get humorous: Laughter releases endorphins and minimizes release of cortisol and adrenaline
  • Drink green tea instead of coffee: While coffee increases adrenaline, green tea has an amino acid called theanine, which has a calming effect
  • Practice mindfulness: This is the act of paying attention to one’s senses, thoughts, and surroundings (more on this important one later)
  • Get exercise: Exercise also releases endorphins and relieves stress
  • Get plenty of sleep: Seven to eight hours
  • Do breathing exercises: Deep breathing oxygenates your blood and increases calm

The more you care for the psychological state of your employees under stress, the more likely they are to stick with you. Mindfulness can even improve performance under stress.

Psychologist Ellen Langer has been studying mindfulness for 40 years. She says, “If everyone is working in the same context and is fully present, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t get a superior coordinated performance.” She lists improvements in attention, creativity, interpersonal relationships, and stress management as benefits of mindfulness. “Question the belief that you’re the only one who can do it, that there’s only one way to do it, and that the company will collapse if you don’t do it. When you open your views to be mindful, the stress just dissipates.”

Know Best Practices

Langer’s advice on mindfulness can truly guide the entire change management process. Because each company is unique, there is no single set of rules or practices guaranteed to be best for your situation. Context determines the way to manage change. Yet, rules do provide guideposts. Being aware of them is like being a musician who masters the basics to enable improvisation and innovation.

Change management best practices make sense—after all, this is about initiating change as well as letting it happen:

  • Change from the top down: As a leader, take a proactive role in delineating how change will take place and who will be on the change management team
  • Pay attention to timing: You may feel a big shakeup is necessary, but can your company handle it all at once? Is right now the best time? What’s a realistic timeline to mitigate risk?
  • Communicate, communicate, communicate: Facilitate communication routinely the whole way through, and disclose technical details to management
  • Pay attention to process: Watch the extent to which various stakeholders in the process need differing levels of assistance and resources, and solicit feedback
  • Plan on disruption: Even when everything seems in place for a transition to go off without a hitch, the theme here is that change is constant; prepare for things not to go as planned, and pinpoint areas where problems may arise

There are a lot of variables that leave room for disruption, such as problems or advances in technology, budget issues, compliance with local and state statutes, personnel losses, etc. Leave room for flexibility. At the same time, with best practices you’re maintaining the framework and order within which disruption and stress are good things.

You want change. You want problems. Without them you don’t improve, you remain stagnant and your employees move onto bigger and better things. Be mindful of change management strategy, and watch your employees flourish as your business does as well.

 

 

]]>
The Pros, Cons, and In-betweens of Starting Your Own Business http://finance.youngmoney.com/careers/the-pros-cons-and-in-betweens-of-starting-your-own-business/ Tue, 25 Apr 2017 14:47:19 +0000 http://finance.youngmoney.com/?p=11517

A black and white world doesn’t exist. If I were to tell you, “There’s absolutely no downside to starting your own business”, I would be be wrong. Rather, starting your own enterprise involves entering a world of complexity you’ve only glimpsed from the outskirts.

The good news: about one-third of new businesses survive 10 years or longer, while about half survive five years or longer. If you’re really in this for the long-term and are ready to go all out, you stand a good chance of sticking around. If you’re not, you stand a good chance of being among the two-thirds who fail.

Pros

  • There’s a lot of assistance available: Simply Google “How to start a business” and there’s a wealth of information. The Small Business Association offers a ton of resources, and you can attend conferences, or other meetups; for an example of the type of info available, check out my article about saving money on internet marketing.
  • There are a ton of options: For one, the possibility of e-commerce opens up a world in which all you need is a product and a website. If you don’t have your own product, there are organizations like Amway that supply products for you to sell. The Amway model is called “Direct Selling”, it typically provides a supplemental option for aspiring entrepreneurs. Three million people worldwide are Amway “Independent Business Owners”, and the direct selling model—in general, not just Amway’s—brought in $36.12 billion in 2015.
  • You can do what you want: What you do with your business is only limited by your own ambition. If you want to keep it small, keep it small. If you want to go big, do your best to appeal to a wider and wider audience.
  • You can offer true personalization: You are the shop-next-door, the equivalent of today’s mom-and-pop operation, the underdog, the face of what has made America great from the get-go. You can get to know your customers face-to-face, learn their names, what they like, what their friends like, and, ultimately, what your target audience wants and needs.
  • You can end your job search: Young adults ages 20-28 change careers an average of seven times before arriving where they want to be; start a business doing something you really want to do, and stop the vicious cycle of looking for a new job and being dissatisfied with what you find.

In-betweens

  • There’s a lot of responsibility: Some people thrive on responsibility and love it, while for others the level of responsibility involved in starting a business is just too much. Before starting a business, evaluate what type of person you are and ask yourself if you’re willing to invest your entire life in it.
  • There’s a ton of competition: On one hand, the many advanced, ravenous competitors make it tough to gain an advantage; on the other, competition is good for business because your competitors will push you to be better.
  • You can’t just sit there and focus on product: If your offering is all you’re passionate about, this can be a difficult truth to recognize: a great deal of your success will depend on marketing and branding, networking with other business owners, maintaining inventory and keeping air-tight books. This is why it’s important to raise funds for hiring consultants and specialists, but nothing beats learning how to do everything yourself.

Cons

  • People try to take advantage of you: The more your business grows, the more you’ll be on the radar of other businesses and individuals who will try to take advantage of you in one way or another—and there’s simply no escaping the fact that there are bad actors in the world. Beware, do your homework, and don’t go into business with anyone unless they’re squeaky clean. Make sure their proposition is legitimate in terms of how you’ll come out on the other end.
  • You can end up being out-of-touch, overconfident, or overly-stressed: Of course, this won’t necessarily happen, but single-mindedness can be the result of overzealous pursuit. Out of Forbes’ reasons why businesses fail, a big one is leadership failure. The other reasons, such as failure to properly communicate a value proposition, stem from the owner being disconnected from the people upon which the business depends.
  • It’s about nothing but money: In the beginning, making good money was going to be a byproduct, not the end-all-be-all, because you were passionate about people and ideas, not just money; don’t let dollar signs become your only reason for doing business. Those bad actors I talked about earlier? They’re motivated by moolah.
  • It becomes ho-hum: You’re not doing anything different, you’re set in your ways, and so are the people who keep you afloat; continue on this way, and you’ll soon find yourself gasping for air.

The great thing about starting a business is the cons depend on you. Decide to steer clear of the bad actors, not to be one yourself, and to stay attuned to the evolving business world. Evolve with it, even ahead of it, and you’ll see more pros than cons.

]]>
When I Grow Up, I Want to Be… http://finance.youngmoney.com/careers/when-i-grow-up-i-want-to-be/ http://finance.youngmoney.com/careers/when-i-grow-up-i-want-to-be/#comments Fri, 21 Jan 2011 21:06:59 +0000 http://finance.youngmoney.com/?p=9928 One of the most common things I hear is this: Jordana, I would love to start my own business, but I have no idea what I want to do! Sound familiar?

So many people stop themselves from moving forward because they’re waiting for the perfect idea to come their way. While those AHA moments are lovely, and we would love them to show up on demand, sometimes those precious little moments need some coaxing.

There are a few things you should first know:

1. It is MUCH easier to decide what business you want to create than you probably think it is.

2. If you don’t know yet, that’s okay! Have you heard of the saying, “When the student is ready, the teacher appears?” In fact, you’re actually already on your way, simply by reading this!

So how do you figure out what kind of business you want to create? It all comes down to 2 factors: what do you love to do AND who do you love to spend time with. Oftentimes, business owners don’t realize that they really can create whatever they want! (disclaimer: you must add value in some way, but otherwise, the world is really your oyster).

Here are a few questions to ask yourself to help you along your way:

* What do you love to do? Like absolutely, positively, could spend your entire day doing it, LOVE to do?
* If money wasn’t a factor, what would you REALLY want to be doing with your time?
* Who do you love to spend your time with most? What kind of people do you gravitate towards?

If answers aren’t coming to you immediately, spend the next week taking note of the times when you’re having so much fun that you just WISH you could spend your whole day doing it – and this might be something as simple as connecting with people, or being outside. Sure it might not tell you yet the specifics of what your business will look like, but it definitely starts to give you an idea.

Next steps?

Write a list of your top 10 most favorite things to do. Then for each one, ask yourself what you like about it.

Write another list of your top 10 strengths – what do you think you do best.

One more list – describe in detail the kind of person you would want to work with – from gender to age to personality.

Looking at all of these lists, start thinking about ways that you can combine them into a business where you are doing something you love, doing something you’re good at, while working with people who you enjoy being around.

]]>
http://finance.youngmoney.com/careers/when-i-grow-up-i-want-to-be/feed/ 2
Starting a Business? You Need a Website and a Simple CMS http://finance.youngmoney.com/technology/starting-a-business-you-need-a-website-and-a-simple-cms/ http://finance.youngmoney.com/technology/starting-a-business-you-need-a-website-and-a-simple-cms/#comments Mon, 30 Aug 2010 14:37:31 +0000 http://finance.youngmoney.com/?p=9360 If your business  doesn’t have a website these days it feels almost like it doesn’t exist. Of course there are businesses which do not need a website. Plumbers come to mind.  But think about it for a minute. Everyone researches new business relationships or new vendors online. So if there isn’t any information there, you might not get that business. At the very least a brochure-like site which describes your business and what you do is necessary. Most of us don’t have the html chops to design our own site. And managing content without a clean interface, which makes sense to a layman, is almost impossible otherwise.

So a big thank you to Mashable.com for creating a great list of Content Management Systems (CMS) that we can understand and use.

1. MojoMotor

2. CushyCMS

3. GetSimple CMS

4. Simple CMS

5. Perch

Read detailed explanations at Mashable.com. WordPress is the most popular CMS on the market today, but it might be overkill for you, according to Mashable. Personally, I love WordPress and never have any problem using it to do everything I want to do.

]]>
http://finance.youngmoney.com/technology/starting-a-business-you-need-a-website-and-a-simple-cms/feed/ 2
Find a Job with Fast Growing Companies in 2010 http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/business_planning/find-a-job-with-fast-growing-companies-in-2010/ http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/business_planning/find-a-job-with-fast-growing-companies-in-2010/#comments Wed, 25 Aug 2010 14:18:55 +0000 http://finance.youngmoney.com/?p=9345 Who’s hiring?  A company that’s growing fast, that’s who. And luckily for you, Inc. just announced their annual list of the  5000 fastest growing companies. I’m not saying you will find a job necessarily. However, if a company is growing and you can get your foot in that door it will set you up for a nice future. As the company grows, they will need to hire people behind you which means that you may rise to management faster in a young-growing company than you would in a more established business.

We may still be in a recession. Fortunately,  these are companies that have created growth industries, or are innovative enough to redefine an industry. Businesses range from those in energy to personal finance. Some a service related, some are manufacturers. The list is so varied it’s inspiring.

Locations also vary widely. The top 10 metro areas on the list:

10. Houston, TX
9. Philadelphia, PA
8. San Francisco, CA
7. Dallas-Fort Worth, TX
6. Atlanta, GA
5. Boston, MA
4. Chicago, IL
3. Los Angeles, CA
2. Washington, D.C.
1. New York City, NY

That’s good news for job hunters. Almost anywhere in this country you can find a growing company.

]]>
http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/business_planning/find-a-job-with-fast-growing-companies-in-2010/feed/ 1
Why are you an Entrepreneur? http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/why-are-you-an-entrepreneur/ Sat, 12 Jun 2010 13:59:33 +0000 http://finance.youngmoney.com/?p=8843 Just read a good article this morning about entrepreneurship at Tech Crunch. It discusses the idea that all start-ups mustn’t raise capital or take on investors in an effort to sell one day. That it’s okay to have what’s called a “life-style” business. I couldn’t agree more. Not everyone wants to become the next Google, Mint or Facebook. In fact, most start-ups are plumbers, retail store owners, or otherwise small and local. And that’s a fine life to lead in my opinion.

Read the full article here.

]]>
Agencies Join Together to help Rural Entrepreneurship http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/agencies-join-together-to-help-rural-entrepreneurship/ http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/agencies-join-together-to-help-rural-entrepreneurship/#comments Mon, 07 Jun 2010 18:50:00 +0000 http://finance.youngmoney.com/careers/agencies-join-together-to-help-rural-entrepreneurship/ Those looking to engage in rural entrepreneurship may find help through government programs.One roadblock for entrepreneurship is finding the money to start a business, a fact that may be especially true for people in rural areas.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture noted that many young people are moving away from rural communities to find better opportunities in other areas. However, the department, through a partnership with the U.S. Small Business Association, hopes to create better access to loans and grants for businesses in these parts of the country.

The agreement between the two agencies will last for three years and will try to create opportunities for entrepreneurship. That could include loans or technical assistance.

"Small businesses and entrepreneurs are a key source of job creation and the foundation of local economies in rural communities across the country," SBA Administrator Karen Mills said.

Field offices of both the USDA and SBA will work more closely and exchange reference materials, which will be distributed to people in rural areas looking for help in starting or maintaining a business.

Other efforts from the USDA to help expand opportunities include grant programs to create better broadband access for rural communities.ADNFCR-3389-ID-19822206-ADNFCR

]]>
http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/agencies-join-together-to-help-rural-entrepreneurship/feed/ 1
Last Day of TechCrunch Disrupt: Watch it Live http://finance.youngmoney.com/entrepreneur/last-day-of-techcrunch-disrupt-watch-it-live/ Wed, 26 May 2010 14:13:00 +0000 http://finance.youngmoney.com/?p=8695 Techcrunch is all about people and companies that are making a difference as entrepreneurs or with leading edge technology. I find their blog to be very useful and fascinating. If you’re an entrepreneur, or even just someone who appreciates technology its a good read on most days. This week they have their conference in New York City.

Watch it here live.

See below.

Watch live streaming video from disrupt at livestream.com
]]>